Raised on the Radio

Because growing up on 70s television didn't kill me. It just made me who I am today.


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Indie Artist William Steffey

Although we may be highly influenced by the music that came along before the digital age, the beauty of technology is how it has opened doors for Indie artists to record, produce and distribute their music without the 100s of thousands usually put up by a record company and promoters.

william steffey

William Steffey is one of those musicians so dedicated to his art that the creating and sharing is more important than the time and energy needed to deal with a producer and record company. He’s all those guys wrapped in to one and has been recording his own music for 25 years.

I recently had a chance to talk to him about his music and what makes him tic, to take a look inside.

JK: I’m really interested to know what created your passion for music?

WS: I had a rather stormy childhood, but was always able to find refuge from the elements in the grooves of vinyl 45’s in my parents’ basement. Paperback Writer, Day Tripper, Paint it Black, I Get Around, Kodachrome. Music was a magical world where I could escape and reflect. In my early teens I remember visiting Lake Geneva regularly with my mom and her boyfriend where I was introduced to the great songwriting of Chapin, Croce, and Lightfoot.

JK: How did that translate into you playing and recording your own music?

WS: I [began playing] all the ‘rock instruments’, which basically translates to guitar, bass, keyboards, drums, and vocals. I also have been producing since my father gave me a 4-track recorder when I was 12.

JK: Wow, that’s a lot of instruments! Do you have a favorite?

WS: My primary and favorite instrument is “the song”. All the instruments I play are just the tools used to compose and realize a solid track.

JK: It sounds like you had a really solid foundation in Rock and Folk Music.  Is there a musician or songwriter that influenced your sound more than any other?

WS: From a production standpoint, Thomas Dolby has probably influenced my sound more than anybody else. He’s known by his 80’s hit “She Blinded Me With Science”, which was somewhat of an anomaly in his catalog. The lion’s share of his other songs feature Introspective lyrics, interesting chord changes, and lush production. Guitar-wise I’m largely influenced by Johnny Marr who began his career with The Smiths.

JK: So now, with your varied musical influences, what is the genre with which you most identify?

WS: My songs fall somewhere in between new-wave, rock, and electronic with a tiny hint of jazz. I sometimes use the phrase “post-modern rock” to describe the pastiche of styles. Some of the groups that I find influential (e.g. Prefab Sprout, Roxy Music, The Smiths) have been labeled “sophisti-pop” and I think that works for me, too. The genres tend to move around a lot on my albums, and it’s only just in the past year that I’ve consciously been honing in on a more solidified sound. I recorded a song called “Scattering Platinum” and I liked the feel of it so much that I decided to make more songs using the same sound palette. I’ve been writing a few more tracks sticking to the exact same drum kit, effects, guitar tone, and keyboard patches. It makes for a kind of cohesion that comes naturally for bands that go in and record in a more traditional studio.

JK: Clearly your music is constantly evolving, where do you see it going next?

WS: I think my lyrics have always been honest, but they’ve also been incredibly cryptic. While I still have been writing with a decent amount of word play and metaphor, I am becoming more direct. I’m almost getting to a point where two listeners might come up with the same interpretation for the same song!

JK: (chuckle) That being said, who is your primary audience?

WS: Many of my songs are played online several hundred times a month… the song “Molly Molly” is consistently the most popular, but I have no way of telling who the audience is. I’m guessing much of my audience is comprised of people named Molly?

JK: Do you have a lot of interactions with Molly your listeners?

WS: Just enough to keep me going, and not enough to disrupt my routine at all. I occasionally get email from listeners, and just recently was recognized by a fan while I was out having coffee. He took a picture with me, and had me autograph one of my cds which he happened to have on his person. It is entirely possible that I was more excited than he was.

JK: How has the readily available digital download effected you?

WS: I like that my music is available online all over the world. It has allowed me to connect with people I never would have otherwise. Also, it costs me practically nothing to release an album, whereas manufacturing cds on a regular basis was getting pretty expensive. Also, I don’t have to worry about my catalog of songs getting lost.

JK: Is it possible for you to be a full-time musician?

WS: The fact that I don’t regularly play out makes full-time musicianship impossible. When I was younger I thought that fame was the end-all-be-all, but now I think I would just find it incredibly invasive. I don’t like being the center of attention, and I don’t enjoy the idea of being on the road constantly, either. I’m perfectly content with the amount of attention my music gets. I do freelance web design to make my way, and I enjoy it very much.

As much as we love our well-known artists here at Raised on the Radio, we recognize the amazing music that is being made by Indie artists who are playing for the love of music.

Since conducting this interview William Steffey’s song Belfast was nominated in Best Song’s of 2013 by DePaul Radio’s Atttagag Radio Show

Please take the time to check out William Steffey’s music:

WilliamSteffey.com

William Steffey on CD Baby

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New Releases by Some Classic Rockers and Singer Songwriters

new releases.jpg

Are you as burnt out as I am?

I’m ready for something new … something different … something that I can get into and forget everything that’s been going on.

tommy castro

Tommy Castro and the Painkillers just put out a new blues album. If you’re a fan of the blues, you’ll be happy to know that some of the guest artists on this release include Joe Bonamassa, Tasha Taylor, Tab Benoit, Marcia Ball, Magic Dick and The Holmes Brothers. Here’s a sample for you:

“The Devil You Know”

David Crosby  Croz

David Crosby (yeah, of Crosby, Stills & Nash fame) just released one last week, too! It’s called “Croz”, and is one of the best collections of songs he’s put out in years. Close your eyes and mellow out a bit and you’ll be able to imagine being around in the late sixties and early seventies when he was in his prime.

“What’s Broken”

bruce springsteen   98797879

And, the Boss is back. New Jersey’s own, Bruce Springsteen has just released “High Hopes”, an album of great songs that remind you who really is the boss to this day. True, Clarence is up in the sky serenading Rock Angels with his haunting saxophone. However, the Boss and is still accompanied by Nils Lofgren, Stevie Van Zandt, Max Weinberg, Patti Scialfa and others that have been with him for decades, in addition to a new relationship brewing with lead guitarist Tom Morello.

“High Hopes”

Neil Young  Live At The Cellar Door 1974

Who doesn’t like Neil Young? Okay, I saw a hand or two out there. Yes, there’s times when he goes too far with his music. But, wouldn’t you rather have that than someone who bores you to death time after time sounding the same as the previous twenty albums? No? Well, just for you, Neil released an archived performance from 1970 at the Cellar Door. Here’s a cut I know you’ll remember.

“Old Man”

Passenger   All The Little Lights

There’s a new kid on the block that brings back memories only too well. Passenger is a singer that sounds like Cat Stevens so much, you’d swear he was his son. (Could be, but who’s telling?) Seriously, if you’re looking for modern mellow, Passenger is for you. Listen to this one and tell me I’m not right.

“Let Her Go”

London Grammar  If You Wait

What do you say about a group you only discovered because their album download was just $3.99 on Amazon.com? How about far freaking out! I can only relate to the 90’s group Portishead in comparing them with any recent band, and I personally feel they exceed them in quality. London Grammar doesn’t seem like they’re going to be a flash in the pan. If they keep putting out music like this, they’ll be around for years to come.

“Hey Now”

Jennifer Nettles   That Girl

Feel like a little Country music? Remember Sugarland? Well, Jennifer Nettles has decided to give a solo album a go. It’s a little bit country, a little bit rock ‘n roll, and a little bit boring. But, if you’re looking to just sit back and lounge around for an hour, you couldn’t pick a more fitting album. “That Girl” came out a few weeks ago, and has been doing well on the charts. Give this song a chance and see if you don’t like it.

“That Girl”

So, sit back, shake the chill out of the system, and relax awhile with this Chill Out Playlist. You deserve it. Remember, soon the snow and ice will be gone and Springtime will be here! And, remember what April brings!

beatles rain

“Rain”

Ciao!

Having grown up during the 50′s & 60′s, Rich was a personal witness to the confusion of the times. His love of music drew him into the conflicts of the day as he protested many of the atrocities in civil rights and an overseas war. Ironically, military service, during the final days of the Vietnam Conflict, ended a music career in a successful band. However, his love of music held true as he later chose a career as a radio announcer over law school. Here, along with being able to play the music he cherished, he interviewed many top music acts. This allowed him to gain much knowledge of the recording industry and the psyche of music artists in rock, jazz and R&B. Later, his love of performing transformed him into a career in stand-up comedy. Twenty years later, his love for music continues. Quote: “Being born in 1954, Rock ‘N Roll and I have grown up together. I wouldn’t have had it any other way!”


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The Blues: New Releases

blues new releases

I’m sitting here, listening to Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown sing about being “Born In Louisiana.”

This might be called “mellow” Blues.

In fact, most of this album, “10 Days Out: Blues From The Backroads” might be called “mellow” blues.  But, then again, since when does the blues have to be hardcore?

Kenny Wayne Shepherd got together with many of the most famous, but some of the most obscure blues artists of the past and came out with this album.  It contains a couple of studio tracks, but mostly live cuts.  And, what live cuts they are!

The King is here … B.B. King that is, and you’ll never hear a better live performance of “The Thrill Is Gone” then you will here.  In fact, most of the songs you’ll hear here are better than normal.

KWS with Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown

No, it’s not because Kenny Wayne Shepherd is playing along with the classic stars.  As much as I hate to say it, I’m not that much of a KWS fan.  Oh, I’ve got a couple of his albums, but mostly, I find his vocals something beyond “melodious.”  Can’t help it.  That’s just the way it is.

I will admit to him being a strong musician on the guitar, though.  And, it doesn’t have to be a power strokin’ mode to sound good.  KWS does extremely well on many of the acoustic tunes here.

Still, it’s the classic artists that make this what it is.  Besides B.B. King, KWS joins Cootie Stark, Neal “Big Daddy” Pattman, Henry Gray, Henry Townsend, Etta Baker, Pinetop Perkins, and many others in making this a Blues cd you won’t want to pass on.

So, sit back, grab a beer or drink of your choice, and let the toe tapping begin.  You won’t be sorry you did!

I took a chance on a cd the other night.  It’s by a Blues band known as The Homemade Jamz Blues Band.

Who?

That’s just what I thought when I saw it.  After investigating, I found that this band was formed in 2007 by two brothers and their younger sister (she was only nine at the time).  Not only that, but the brothers use a homemade guitar and bass that were made out of used automobile parts!  How’s that for rustic?

The Homemade Jamz Blues Band  “Rumors”

Don’t let it turn you away, by any means.  In fact, these kids (I use the term loosely) have won so many honors and awards it’s unbelievable, including the Bay Area’s Blues Society West Coast Hall Of Fame Blues New Artist Of The Year for 2008.  (The size of the trophy had to be monstrous just to get all that on the tag!)

Whether you like is slow and classic sounding, or fast and more progressive, this band will take you there.  They’ve been around for a while now, and their latest release, “I Got Blues For You”, continues to ensure they’ll be here for a long time coming.

Ben Harper has classified himself as an artist of many genres.  True, he’s never had a major crossover hit of any sorts, but considering the crap that becomes hit records these days, that might be more a blessing than a curse.

Charlie Musselwhite, at 69 years of age, has more experience in playing the Blues than Harper’s got years on this Earth.  He started playing with many of the greats as a teenager, later became a major part of the Paul Butterfield Blues Band, and then broke out again on his own.

So, what do you get when you put the two of them together?

I wish I could tell you for sure.  I’m still undecided on this release.  Not that it’s a bad release, it’s just really different when it comes to what one would consider traditional, or even progressive blues.  Oh, there’s the typical blues riffs and such, but I just feel like there’s something missing here.  The following tune is one of the few the combination of the two works well.

Ben Harper & Charlie Musselwhite “You Found Another Friend”

Charlie’s work is outstanding.  I think Harper’s the weak link.  He seems to present the Blues in a fashion not conducive to blues artists.  It’s almost as if a folk singer walked into a Blues bar and said, “Hey, I can do that!”  Sadly, he found out quickly that the Blues is more of an art form than he anticipated, or, was prepared to handle.  Thinking even more about it, it almost sounds like he’s trying to emulate a Lenny Kravitz sound on a couple of the tracks.  Definitely not what one expects from the Blues!

Again, nothing against Harper.  I have many of his albums and enjoy them.  It might have been the production.  I don’t think so, but I’m willing to give a well-known artist a break.  I hope he deserves it.

And, “No”, I won’t be giving anyone this album for Christmas this year.  I might pick up a copy or two of Charlie’s “Ace of Harps”, but not this one.

I try to keep the friends I have.

Now, several of you know that I’m a big Joe Bonamassa fan.  However, as wonderful as a guitar player that I think he is, I’m beginning to look at him as I did Stevie Ray Vaughan.

What?  Attack Stevie Ray Vaughan?

No, not attack.  Just making a comparison.  SRV and Joe both have many great songs.  And, you immediately know the songs are theirs.  Maybe, too much so.

Same riffs, same beats, same old same old.  Oh, there’s always songs that can be pointed out to be different, but, then again, there’s still major similarities to be found in their signature style.  I guess it just boils down to if you like their style enough to listen to it album after album after album.   (“Yawn!”)

In March, Joe released, “An Acoustic Evening At The Vienna Opera House.”  Sad to say, this one didn’t even chart on the U.S. Blues Chart.

Joe Bonamassa  “Slow Train”

Have we heard enough from Joe?  Is it the same stuff being rehashed and put out time and time again?  Or, has his association and participation in the rock band “Black Country Communion” creating a glitch in the Blues energy he was once able to demonstrate?

Hell if I know!

“An Acoustic Evening At The Vienna Opera House” is a nice production to listen to on a long drive at night.  It won’t give you a headache, and some of the tunes (if you’re familiar with Joe), will have you singing along.

But, if you’re not familiar with this individual, and still insist on buying a live album of his in order to get a sampling of his music, I would recommend “Live From The Royal Albert Hall” instead.  The power he projects from this once in a lifetime experience is beyond compare, and his playing impeccable.  And, even though Eric Clapton kind of takes second fiddle during their song together, it’s still a tremendous version to enjoy!

Joe Bonamassa & Eric Clapton “Further On Up The Road”

“…Opera House” deserves six out of ten stars.  If you choose “… Albert Hall”, you’ll enjoy a nine star affair!  The choice is yours!

As I’ve said a couple of times, everyone’s taste in music is different.  I’ve never met another person that likes exactly the same things that I do, nor do I ever want to.  Music is a personal decision.  Just because one person likes one thing over another, it doesn’t make them a music God to follow verbatum.  In fact, be different from the masses and experiment with all different styles and genres.

Who knows?

You just might find something you like!

About the Author:

Having grown up during the 50′s & 60′s, Rich Rumple was a personal witness to the confusion of the times. His love of music drew him into the conflicts of the day as he protested many of the atrocities in civil rights and an overseas war. Ironically, military service, during the final days of the Vietnam Conflict, ended a music career in a successful band. However, his love of music held true as he later chose a career as a radio announcer over law school. Here, along with being able to play the music he cherished, he interviewed many top music acts. This allowed him to gain much knowledge of the recording industry and the psyche of music artists in rock, jazz and R&B. Later, his love of performing transformed him into a career in stand-up comedy. Twenty years later, his love for music continues.
Quote: “Being born in 1954, Rock ‘N Roll and I have grown up together. I wouldn’t have had it any other way!”


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Sly and The Family Stone takes you Higher!

sly higher!

Everybody is a Star

The best thing that could have ever happened to me and Sly was the release of the new box set – Sly and the Family Stone, Higher!

Growing up in the 70’s I was spoon fed Sly. I wasn’t living in San Francisco, and even if I was, I am pretty sure they wouldn’t have let a 4-year-old in his shows. So how could I possibly know?! HOW!

The truth is, I really didn’t become acquainted with Sly that much until I was a, let’s say, “free-thinking” college student looking for the funk. But even then it was just the freaking tip of the iceberg. And when you spend a lot of time with the tip of the iceberg, it starts to get old. And boring. And gray.

Ah, so how is it, that 40 years after Sly’s genius was being recognized I am only seeing it now? Because, this is one of those rare instances where the record industry did see it. Those record puppeteers pretty much gave Sly free rein. That is how you KNOW he was a genius. Sure, they gave him so input, and he gladly took it. He was not at all averse to “dumbing it down” to get in the door.

But the sheer truth is, that Sly and the Family Stone were at their very best playing live, they never failed to fill a venue. And frankly, when they were given free rein to jam in the studio, it was magical.

Did you know he wasn’t always the singer, or ever the only one? He was the magician, the creator – the genie on the sweet keys, or maybe making those strings sing, or maybe all of it. Because he was that guy.

He was that guy who ONLY played what he felt, he only wrote his truth. The music, the words they really came from his soul. He never sold out, he was perfectly happy with the idea of making his music accessible to the masses because even the straight folks should be able to enjoy his music.

If you ever had any doubt at all of his genius or his truth. Listen to this Live version of Stand! Sly will bare his soul and lend you a hand all at once.

Oh, you have to listen to this.

The more I read about Sly, the more I wanted to hug him, sit with him, be in his presence, have a conversation with him. A gift like his is so rare. It really is, that to just be able to share a moment with it, can enrich for a lifetime. And although The Family Stone has played without him, and don’t get me wrong they are some FREAKING amazing musicians, it’s not the same as the man. You can play the music, but the music was born out of the man.

I’ve read a lot of people who said is music was “simple” but when you look at the big picture, it was anything but. Sure some songs were technically simple, but look at The Beatles, it doesn’t make them any less genius.

And I’ve read that Frank Zappa didn’t think much of him, which I find fascinating and disappointing. There must be some underlying story there, because my only reason for looking into that question was some similarities I heard, as a Zappa fan. There’s allusion to Frank thinking he was a sell-out, but Sly was not a sell-out, he genuinely wanted everyone to “Dance to the Music”.

Following The Dead for so many years I can only imagine that a Sly and the Family Stone show would have been like that times a million as far as the jams and getting down, man Getting Funky!

Talk about a time when you had to be there to truly understand! Luv N’ Haight, man – I took a break from life for a while and crashed with some friends for a few months in San Francisco. Spent many a day up by the Haight, but it was not this. Nope. Those days are gone, we can only listen now.

Also, love to hear Cynthia sing.

Sly and Carlos Santana got really close, listen to this song, sound familiar? Music was love, Sly was happy for his songs to be repurposed and redone between people who loved music.

I Ain’t Got Nobody – Sly and the Family Stone

Do you know how many songs you’ve known and loved by other artists?

Turn You Loose – Sly and the Family Stone – This is how it’s done.

How about a song that starts out as a dis-jointed children’s song we all grew up with and turns into a funky jam, with an amazing horn section about social injustice?

Underdog – Sly and the Family Stone

Sy and the Family Stone opened the door for R&B funk bands like Ohio Players, George Clinton, The Parliament Funkadelic (or P-Funk), Kool and the Gang and even Stevie Wonder. Disco owes its life to Funk and Funk owes its acceptance to Sly Stone and James Brown.

Look further into Sly and The Family Stone, you won’t be sorry. I admit his Greatest Hits get’s your body groovin’, but the hidden gems are the songs that got no air time, and even the songs that never made it to an album.

Check the new box set out, you won’t be sorry.  Grab it on Amazon, don’t take a short-cut and just get the music. You NEED the book that comes with it. The images and the biographical information about each song is priceless.

Sly and The Family Stone Box Set – Higher

I never intended to write Sly and the Family Stone Higher! Review I discovered it at my local library and had to have it. So if funds are tight for you, I get that. I would totally check out your local library! Mine had this! But then it was so awesome I had to buy it anyway.

About the Author:

Jen Kehl is a 40-something chick, who has finally come to terms with the fact that she is still a deadhead music freak trapped in side the body of someone’s mother. She often finds herself stuck in the 70′s with the all of the rainbows and unicorns.  She blogs at My Skewed View and created the music site Raised on the Radio, where she’s tricked a bunch of awesome writers into sharing their music experiences with you. She is also a published author as part of the anthology The Mother of All Meltdowns available on Amazon.

Connect with her on twitter @jenkehlFacebook, and Google+.


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New Releases by Classic Artists

new releases by classic rock

Cher has just released yet another album.

No, the plastic surgery hasn’t hurt her singing voice.

Still, the constant beat that accompanies her voice, one that we hear on 90% of the Pop tunes put out by idiotic record producers of today, tends to be annoying after a couple of songs.  I wish it was only in a couple of songs.  No such luck!

Why would someone with such a great voice allow this to happen?

Could it be that she’s afraid of aging and losing her younger audience?  Is her fear so strong that she, the all powerful and definitely one that could tell today’s producers where to go, actually feels that she must reduce herself to the norm and cover up her vocals with techno pulse electronics?

There are a couple of songs in which she allows her voice to shine.  You can feel her sincerity, love, hopes and dreams in each of these selections.  It’s a shame.  An entire album comprised of these type of songs could be a benchmark for all to reach.  But, fear can be a factor in making the wrong decision.  It is unfortunate that she seems to allow it to rule her career.

Hit Single “Woman’s World”

But, she’s a millionaire and I’m not, so perhaps I’m the one that’s stupid!

Does selling out in order to make money really do her musical talent justice?

For some of us that have followed her career since her “Sonny & Cher” days, we know she’s more than one of today’s “throw away” Pop artists.  Her sound is unique as it calls to your heart in a song like “The Way Of Love”, and mischievous in “Gypsies, Tramps & Thieves.”  But, from way back then to today, something changed.  Something happened to her.  Something occurred in her life that demanded she aim towards the Pop audience only and produce tunes that wouldn’t stand the test of time, but only supply funds for the day.

I’m not saying her new album, “Closer To The Truth” doesn’t have substance.  It does, but in a frivolous manner.  It’s basically a Pop/Dance album that says little in message, but will do well for exercise class music or Pop dance halls.

There’s a difference in “keeping up with the times” and “being true to your music.”  You could do much better, oh talented goddess of the decades!  Please, before it’s too late and the years eat away at your precious vocal ability, give us all something worthy of the praise you deserve!

Something like Elton John’s new album, “The Diving Board.”

I am a fan of early Elton John.  There have been many hits along the way, but there have also been many misses.  I will admit to having every album he’s composed in my collection.  However, most of those released in the 80’s and 90’s are doing a good job of gathering dust.

I will make a statement here that many will probably shoot me for.  Not since “Goodbye Yellow Brick Road” has Elton had the complete quality in an album as his latest presents.

Strong statement, huh?  Believe me, it won’t be a popular one to the snot nosed music reviewers employed today.  You know, the ones that were raised on 90’s music and have never listened to anything previous to  that time period.

At first listen, the album will pull you into a world of mournful loss and storytelling beauty.  This, regardless of Pop opinion, is what Elton does best and what originally put him on the music map.  I won’t bore you with details, as I’ll let his music and words speak to your heart and soul when you listen to it for the first time.

Elton John  “Home Again”

But, if you’re looking for something to raise you out of this world with an electronic beat, you’ll be disappointed.  He doesn’t use such cheap thrills to get his point across and make a buck.  This, to me, is what Cher needs to see and take note of.  If it is to be Elton’s swan song album, he couldn’t have left a better example of quality of music.

I’ve bought so many albums in the last few months, my wife is going crazy wondering where I’m going to store them.  (Even those downloaded, I make a hard copy to keep in my collection in case of hard drive disaster.  It’s happened twice, so I learned by experience!)  Anyway, out of all of those I’ve purchased, this is the album of the year.  Oh, the Grammy’s won’t recognize it as such.  They only look at the throw away artists for the most part.  But, real music lovers will cherish this selection.

Needless to say, it holds my highest recommendation!

Not so the latest Sting release, “The Last Ship.”

This is where things get strange.  This album seems to be a follow-up to several of his past albums.  It brings about many references to past songs and characters in those songs.  It’s slow, told in a story manner, and I must say, somewhat boring to which to listen all the way through.

“The Last Ship” has it’s good points, especially if you’re trying to get some sleep and need some background music to finish the job.  Yes, boys and girls, can you say, “Boring?”

But, it’s not produced badly, and I guess, if you’re a real Sting fan, you’ll find it has some production value.  Sting’s vocals seem to have dropped and octave over the years, and may even be classified as unrecognizable at times.  But, let’s be real.  The guy is getting up in years and did put a lot of effort into this release.  Sorry, Sting!  I’ve really been a fan for years.  It just didn’t touch my sensitive spot.

Sting  “The Last Ship”

Finally, lets take a look at an artist that may not be too familiar to you.

Laura Mvula has recently released “Sing To The Moon” to the world.  (Thank God, a new artist that dares to be different!)

I can’t classify her music.  I’d love to say R&B, but it’s not.  Jazz?  Nope!  Easy Listening?  Not by any manner!  Pop?  Dream on!  Rock?  Not the furthest thing from the truth!   World Music?  Maybe this is the closest genre she enters.

There is no specific beat.  What?  Listen to it and you’ll see what I mean.  The songs break up into multiple beats, runs, and storylines.  It’s almost like a Broadway music score at times, taking you on a journey into the weird but beautiful land of “keep up with me and you’ll enjoy it!”

This may not be an album for those who love today’s standard trash that’s being aired.  Even I can’t say as though this would be an album that I’d play everyday.  But, I will say that I completely enjoyed it.  “Sing to the Moon” is refreshing in our world of formula sound.  Different?  You bet!  Fun?  You bet!  Storytelling?  Oh My God, YES!  (Just listen to the song “Green Garden” or “Is There Anybody Out There” and enjoy the vision!)

Laura Mvula  “Sing To The Moon”

Laura is a true artist from the meaning of the word.  They still exist (believe it or not) and can hold true to their music.  Not a sell out, at least for now.  Let’s hope she never does!

Remember, music is for the listener.  You may not agree with the above reviews.  That’s okay!  I may not agree with everything you like or dislike either.  The fact remains that there’s a lot of good music available for you to sample.  Don’t hold back.  Experiment with different styles and genres to increase your perspective and collection.  You may be surprised at what you’ll discover.

Ciao!

 

About The Author

Having grown up during the 50′s & 60′s, Rich was a personal witness to the confusion of the times. His love of music drew him into the conflicts of the day as he protested many of the atrocities in civil rights and an overseas war. Ironically, military service, during the final days of the Vietnam Conflict, ended a music career in a successful band. However, his love of music held true as he later chose a career as a radio announcer over law school. Here, along with being able to play the music he cherished, he interviewed many top music acts. This allowed him to gain much knowledge of the recording industry and the psyche of music artists in rock, jazz and R&B. Later, his love of performing transformed him into a career in stand-up comedy. Twenty years later, his love for music continues. Quote: “Being born in 1954, Rock ‘N Roll and I have grown up together. I wouldn’t have had it any other way!”