Raised on the Radio

Because growing up on 70s television didn't kill me. It just made me who I am today.


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Old School Disco New Year’s Eve Playlist – Boogie Fever!

 

disco ball

I’m the 70’s pop culture junkie and frankly, New Year’s Eve isn’t New Year’s Eve without disco. And I don’t mean some new fangled discotheque music. What the heck is a discotheque anyway? Or is it Disco Teka? Whatever it is, that’s not what I’m talking about it. What I’m talking about here is Shaking Your Groove Thang, you know – get down tonight?

Don’t bother trying to deny it. There ain’t no way to stop it, the music starts…maybe a little Commodores? Your head starts bobbing, maybe your shoulders start moving to the rhythm. That’s all right, you don’t have to get out on the dance floor, but your hips are having a party while you’re not even paying attention.

It’s a New Year’s Eve Disco Playlist, because you all know you want one. Turn that party ON people! Nobody’s body doesn’t want to move to the groove, I promise you. But pop in some Sarah Machlaclan for New Year’s and I can bet you everyone’s going home early.

 

Old School Disco Music For New Year’s Eve

Did you know if you click on the bottom YouTube Playlist you can just click play all and have a party right from your computer?

Best of My Love – The Emotions

Sir Duke – Stevie Wonder

Boogie Fever – The Sylvers

Love Rollercoaster – Ohio Players

Shake Your Body (Down To The Ground) – Michael Jackson

Boogie Wonderland – Earth Wind and Fire

Let it Whip – The Dazz Band

Heaven Must Be Missing an Angel – Tavares

Fantasy – Earth Wind and Fire

Knock on Wood – Amii Stewart

Disco Inferno – The Trammps

Kung Fu Fighting – Carl Douglas

Le Freak – Chic

(Shake Shake Shake) Shake Your Booty – KC & The Sunshine Band

Shake Your Groove Thing – Peaches and Herb

That’s the Way (I Like It) – KC & The Sunshine Band

We Are Family – Sister Sledge

Give Me The Night – George Benson

Play That Funky Music – Wild Cherry

Jungle Boogie – Kool and The Gang


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A Swinging Jazz Christmas Playlist

 

christmas_lights_jazz

The table is set, the lights are turned down just the right amount to make the room sparkle and the cheesy Christmas decorations are hidden in another room – leaving only the very tasteful decorations you share with company.

Now shove the kids in another room with Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer and enjoy one night as an adult.

Hit shuffle on your Christmas Party Playlist and in the words of my favorite Jazz DJ Larry Smith “Sit back, relax, and let’s swing together.”

 

A Swinging Jazz Christmas Playlist

The top links go straight to YouTube (at the bottom is the complete YouTube playlist)

The starred links* go to  iTunes so you can download your own

 

Merry Christmas Baby – Kenny Burrell and Richard Evans
*Merry Christmas Baby – Have Yourself a Soulful Little Christmas

Santa Claus is Coming to Town – Bill Evans
*Santa Claus Is Coming to Town – Have Yourself a Jazzy Little Christmas

We Three Kings – Ralph Sutton, Jim Galloway, Milt Hilton and Gus Johnson*
*We Three Kings – Christmas Jazz Greats (Extended Version)

White Christmas – Oscar Peterson
*White Christmas – An Oscar Peterson Christmas

Silent Night – Ellis Marsalis
*Silent Night (feat. Bill Huntington & Jason Marsalis) – A New Orleans Christmas Carol (Gold Edition)

What Are You Doing New Years Eve? – Ramsey Lewis
*What Are You Doing New Year’s Eve? – Sound of Christmas

I’ll Be Home For Christmas – The Four Freshman*
*I’ll Be Home for Christmas – Snowfall

The Christmas Waltz – Beegie Adair
*The Christmas Waltz – Jazz Piano Christmas

God Rest Ye Merry Gentleman – Butch Thompson*
*God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen – Yulestride

Oh Good Grief – Wynton and Ellis Marsalis
*Oh, Good Grief! – Joe Cool’s Blues

Christmas is Coming – David Benoit*
*Christmas Is Coming – 40 Years – A Charlie Brown Christmas

O Christmas Tree – Russell Malone
*O Christmas Tree – Martha Stewart Living Music: Jazz for the Holidays

Christmas Time is Here – Vince Guaraldi
*Christmas Time Is Here (Instrumental) – A Charlie Brown Christmas (Expanded Edition)

We Three Kings of Orient Are – Oliver Jones
*We Three Kings of Orient Are – A Celebration in Time

Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas – Oliver Jones

Jingle Bells – Jimmy Smith
*Jingle Bells – Have Yourself a Jazzy Little Christmas

The Christmas Song – Peter White
*The Christmas Song – Songs of the Season

 

Or listen to most of the list here by clicking play!

Thanks for listening!


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Martini Lounge Christmas Playlist

christmas balls with snow, isolated on white background

‘Tis the season. Whether you partake or not, you can’t help but tap your toes to this special brand of Christmas music. So pull up a chair, grab a martini and enjoy yourself at the Raised on the Radio Christmas Lounge.

A Martini Lounge Christmas

YouTube on the top, bottom links go straight to *iTunes for your permanent enjoyment.

I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus/Jingle Bells Bossa Nova – Ultra-Lounge – Christmas Cocktails, Pt. 1

We Wanna See Santa Do the Mambo – Santa’s Vintage Xmas & Holiday Playlist

‘Zat You, Santa Claus? – Yule Be Miserable

Winter Wonderland (2006 – Remaster) – Christmas With Peggy Lee

Jingle All the Way – Merry Christmas from Lena Horne – EP

Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer Mambo – Christmas Eve (Jazz Christmas)

Jingle Bells Mambo – The Ultimate Mambo Collection

The Christmas Waltz (Remastered) – Merry Christmas, Baby – Romance and Reindeer from Capitol

Cha-Cha All the Way – Ultra-Lounge – Christmas Cocktails, Pt. 1

Holiday on Skis – Al Caiola
Holiday On Skis – Swinging Christmas, Vol. 3

Christmas Trumpets/We Wish You a Very Merry Christmas – Ultra-Lounge – Christmas Cocktails, Pt. 1

Santa Claus Is Coming to Town / White Christmas – Christmas Jazz & Blues

Jingle Bells – Esquivel – to me this is the definitive. I cannot find this on iTunes, because it is out of print, but I know the album is available on amazon, if you have adblock off you should be able to see this link. Esquivel! Merry Xmas From the Space-Age Bachelor Pad

 

In my search for the perfect Martini Lounge Christmas Playlist for our listeners I happened upon an artist I thought was pretty cool, his name is Geoffrey Leigh Tozer. He’s not ultra-famous, but he’s pretty darn good. His Christmas tunes are not on YouTube so this iTunes link will have to do. Also feel free to check him out over at his website Swanktown. He’s a story-teller and a music maker, if you like, won’t you buy it on iTunes? He’s just a guy, sharing his awesome music with us. Here’s a taste:

*update! I contacted Geoffrey and look what he made just for us! A YouTube video of Deck Martinis With Green Olives!

Deck Martinis With Green Olives – A Very Swank Christmas!

And here’s the whole playlist on YouTube so you can just sit back and sip!


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Thanks Dad, For Raising Me on The Radio

michelle liew.jpg

The site happens to have an apt title that resonates with me,because I was almost literally raised on the radio by parents who were, and still are, drawn to the music of the ’50s, ’60s and ’70s. The literal edge of being raised on the radio stems from the fact that Dad, Tony, is a lead guitarist in several bands and jams professionally at musical events and functions. I suppose piano lessons, including those in jazz and pop, also allow me to call myself a “radio baby.”

Being raised by a musician was quite akin to a ride on Disneyworld’s Space Mountain. I never quite knew what thrills or spills to expect.  I never knew where dad’s next gig would take us to or who we would end up meeting. It is the same today. One can describe being raised by him in any number of ways, but one thing it was certainly not-ordinary. Being his daughter meant encounters with a few of Singapore’s radio and musical personalities.

“Raised on the radio”, as far as I am concerned, equates with a little pressure. Dad used to, and always sets, high standards. It can be a challenge living up to his expectations, especially of musicianship. With that pressure came the opportunity to learn, grow and embrace the new, certainly different types of music.

Many thanks to Dad for raising me on the radio. I have put together a Raised By Dad’s Radio Mixtape of songs I was raised with! I hope you’ll enjoy this selection!

The Way You Look Tonight

Originally performed by the Fred Astaire cum Ginger Rogers pair and featured in the song Swing Time, The Way You Look Tonight won an Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1936. Written by Jerome Kern and Dorothy Fields, it has become a standard for swing.

The song certainly emotes, and has unsurprisingly spawned cover versions by Bing Crosby and the latest by Michael Buble. Let’s go a little retro and view the original, shall we?

Going Out of My Head/Cant Take My Eyes Off You

This hit medley for the Lettermen in 1968 showcases the soothing vocals of these fine singers with a little pomp.

With 16 Top Ten Singles including a number 1 on the Billboard Charts, the close-harmony group has scored 5 grammy nominations and 11 gold records. Eclectic harmonies ensure that their tunes cannot be done without.

Dindi

If one has discounted the medicinal of jazz, surely he has to listen to this. Written by Antonio Carlos Jobim for the Brazilian singer Sylvia Telles, nicknamed Dindi, who unfortunately met with a fatal motor accident in 1966.

Soothing and haunting, this is a good number to prompt a little romance or simply lull the senses into soothing sleep. I include a cover version of the song by none other than our favorite swing singer, Ol’ Blue Eyes.

Girl from Ipanema

Again by the musically illustrious Antonio Carlos Jobim, the sexy bossa nova charm of this piece makes it a to-die-for draw. The Portuguese lyrics by Vinicius De Morales give the song a mysterious, sensual edge that has not been lost till this day.

The version performed by Astrud Gilberto became a US hit in 1964, peaking at number 5 on the hot 100 and was at number one for two weeks on the Easy Listening chart.

I seem to have a little affinity with Frank, so include a version sung by him.

Just the way you are

When I interviewed my father viz his favorite song choices, I almost did a war whoop when he picked one of my eternal favorites, Just the Way You Are. What draws me to this Billy Joel number is its meaningful lyrics that stress unconditional acceptance in relationships with others.

From his 1977 album, The Stranger, the song was Joel’s first US Top 10, reaching number three on Billboard. It made a positive change for Joel’s career, giving it the long-lasting success that it has had.

Many thanks to dad for suggesting 5 great songs and to my friends at Raised on the Radio for allowing me to make a guest contribution this week! Do enjoy this playlist!

About the Author:

Michelle Liew is a literature cum ardent pet lover who simply loves music! Fiction and poetry make her tick! Read her wonderful blog Getting Literal


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New Releases by Some Classic Rockers and Singer Songwriters

new releases.jpg

Are you as burnt out as I am?

I’m ready for something new … something different … something that I can get into and forget everything that’s been going on.

tommy castro

Tommy Castro and the Painkillers just put out a new blues album. If you’re a fan of the blues, you’ll be happy to know that some of the guest artists on this release include Joe Bonamassa, Tasha Taylor, Tab Benoit, Marcia Ball, Magic Dick and The Holmes Brothers. Here’s a sample for you:

“The Devil You Know”

David Crosby  Croz

David Crosby (yeah, of Crosby, Stills & Nash fame) just released one last week, too! It’s called “Croz”, and is one of the best collections of songs he’s put out in years. Close your eyes and mellow out a bit and you’ll be able to imagine being around in the late sixties and early seventies when he was in his prime.

“What’s Broken”

bruce springsteen   98797879

And, the Boss is back. New Jersey’s own, Bruce Springsteen has just released “High Hopes”, an album of great songs that remind you who really is the boss to this day. True, Clarence is up in the sky serenading Rock Angels with his haunting saxophone. However, the Boss and is still accompanied by Nils Lofgren, Stevie Van Zandt, Max Weinberg, Patti Scialfa and others that have been with him for decades, in addition to a new relationship brewing with lead guitarist Tom Morello.

“High Hopes”

Neil Young  Live At The Cellar Door 1974

Who doesn’t like Neil Young? Okay, I saw a hand or two out there. Yes, there’s times when he goes too far with his music. But, wouldn’t you rather have that than someone who bores you to death time after time sounding the same as the previous twenty albums? No? Well, just for you, Neil released an archived performance from 1970 at the Cellar Door. Here’s a cut I know you’ll remember.

“Old Man”

Passenger   All The Little Lights

There’s a new kid on the block that brings back memories only too well. Passenger is a singer that sounds like Cat Stevens so much, you’d swear he was his son. (Could be, but who’s telling?) Seriously, if you’re looking for modern mellow, Passenger is for you. Listen to this one and tell me I’m not right.

“Let Her Go”

London Grammar  If You Wait

What do you say about a group you only discovered because their album download was just $3.99 on Amazon.com? How about far freaking out! I can only relate to the 90’s group Portishead in comparing them with any recent band, and I personally feel they exceed them in quality. London Grammar doesn’t seem like they’re going to be a flash in the pan. If they keep putting out music like this, they’ll be around for years to come.

“Hey Now”

Jennifer Nettles   That Girl

Feel like a little Country music? Remember Sugarland? Well, Jennifer Nettles has decided to give a solo album a go. It’s a little bit country, a little bit rock ‘n roll, and a little bit boring. But, if you’re looking to just sit back and lounge around for an hour, you couldn’t pick a more fitting album. “That Girl” came out a few weeks ago, and has been doing well on the charts. Give this song a chance and see if you don’t like it.

“That Girl”

So, sit back, shake the chill out of the system, and relax awhile with this Chill Out Playlist. You deserve it. Remember, soon the snow and ice will be gone and Springtime will be here! And, remember what April brings!

beatles rain

“Rain”

Ciao!

Having grown up during the 50′s & 60′s, Rich was a personal witness to the confusion of the times. His love of music drew him into the conflicts of the day as he protested many of the atrocities in civil rights and an overseas war. Ironically, military service, during the final days of the Vietnam Conflict, ended a music career in a successful band. However, his love of music held true as he later chose a career as a radio announcer over law school. Here, along with being able to play the music he cherished, he interviewed many top music acts. This allowed him to gain much knowledge of the recording industry and the psyche of music artists in rock, jazz and R&B. Later, his love of performing transformed him into a career in stand-up comedy. Twenty years later, his love for music continues. Quote: “Being born in 1954, Rock ‘N Roll and I have grown up together. I wouldn’t have had it any other way!”


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FirstNotes and ForeverMusic

lizzi guest post ROTR

I was raised in a pretty shut-down household, where the music available was a strict diet of Classic FM (which I now love), Classical CDs (I love some of them), ‘Churchy’ music (still not that keen), and Gilbert and Sullivan (hate it with a passion).

There was one exception (other than the stalwart ‘sung Times Tables’ tapes) – one copy of a hearkening back to my Dad’s childhood; a ‘Hello Children Everywhere’ CD. I listened to it obsessively, whenever I was allowed to use the (gigantic old monster of a) stereo system, in brushed steel, with heavy dials and buttons which swirled deliciously in my hands and would land me in trouble, because somehow the volume always seemed to end up louder.

danny-kaye

So thanks to the lifeline of this one CD, I caught a tiny break and spent my childhood having my mind blown by such wonders as Suzi Miller’s ‘Bimbo’, Burl Ives’ ‘Big Rock Candy Mountain’ and Danny Kaye’s ‘Little White Duck’.

My musical world exploded into life when I went to secondary school.

I’d chosen a school in a town outside the city, which meant being bussed in with a bunch of other local kids. We were herded onto a scabby old, white mini-bus, with a snarkastic driver who tended to be either overly friendly or overly mean, but the journeys had one HUGE redeeming feature, which quite made them a favourite part of my day. The radio.

Tuned for the first time in my LIFE to something beyond the realms of the classical, 103.2 Power FM gave me my first taste of what I’d been missing, and just what depths of wonder there were to explore. Chaka Demus and Pliers ‘Twist and Shout’, D:Ream ‘Things can only get better’, UB40 ‘(I can’t help) Falling In Love With You’, not to mention Rednex, who I can probably hold fully responsible for my ongoing love of countryish music, since then broadened to include such gorgeousness as Bill Monroe, Rascal Flatts and Blake Shelton

I remember with absolute delight my very first tape.

It was given to me for my birthday by neighbours over the road. It was Robson & Jerome’s version of Unchained Melody, with B sides of ‘I believe’ and ‘Saturday Night at the Movies’ (so deeply ingrained in my mind that I didn’t even look it up to check the B sides – I’m probably right, and if not, well it was 18 years ago…). I can’t remember how, but I got a tape player, and discovered, to my delight and awe, that I too, could get Power FM tuned in, directly into my bedroom and began listening at home, ignoring repeated shouts to “Turn that horrible noise down!” as often as I could.

I then discovered (oh sweet day) that a store nearby actually SOLD the music I’d heard on the radio (yes, I was *that* sheltered). My pocket-money immediately became a hugely important deal, and I even began forgoing my weekly Beano comic to buy tapes and tapes…and then I discovered CDs, back when a single was still 99p. To my shame, I can’t remember my first single. Or my first album.

Buying blank tapes and sitting hunched over the radio waiting for my favourite songs to come on, with my finger hovering, poised, over ‘Play’ and ‘Record’ was a massive pastime for me. The irritating DJ or radio jingle forever intertwined with the intro and outro, the missing first three seconds when my attention span had waned.

I developed some serious musical crushes, my ears, mind and soul being touched in ways I’d never felt before – thoughts and emotions expressed in ways I’d never considered possible. I became a cray-cray fan of such acts as Robbie Williams, Alisha’s Attic and All Saints.

And gradually the radio became my companion.

I branched out, finding new stations which weren’t all pop. I discovered rock, house, trance, dance, disco, and later on, music from generations slightly before my own, which is where I feel my musical soul now lives, courtesy of my new-found favourite radio station – 106 Jack FM. They play music from about early in my own musical introduction back to a generation or so before my time, mixed with a few newer tracks for good measure – Aerosmith, Queens of the Stone Age, Dave Edmunds, Faith No More, Queen, Reef, ELO, T-Rex, Tommy James and the Shondells …. But even though it’s my favourite, I can’t stay faithful – my car (which is my ‘Radio Place’) has an old-fashioned stereo/tape player, with a different station (yes, including Classic FM – shh!) programmed into each of its five buttons.

(Small Victory – takes a while to get going; if you want to skip straight to the Good Stuff, head to 2:22 for a guitar riff which just *does things* to me)

In spite of that, my musical ‘old soul’ still has to resort to the not-the-radio resource of YouTube to supply such gorgeousness as The Andrews Sisters, The Beach Boys, Elvis, Flanders and Swann; usually with one or two tracks hitting my ‘favourites’ list on YouTube, as opposed to loving everything the band produced, as in the heyday of First Discovering Music.

But it’s not the same. YouTube is cold and clinical, and sometimes highly irritating (although everything’s ‘on tap’). The DJs on Jack FM have become my pals – I know the ins and outs of their public personas. I follow their news. I even follow the station on Twitter and Facebook. I recognize their voices. I dance in my car to their music choices, and I love it.

The world of music has become an outlet – I can use music to describe how I feel far better than I can use words. Music speaks to the soul rather than the intellect, and since my very first introduction, I knew that radio and I would get along, though it’s definitely moved up in status over the years from ‘companion’ to ‘Forever Friend’. Thank you Radio, for giving me so much.

About the Author:

Lizzi Rogers is a non-professional blogger over at Considerings. Her aim is to Think Deeply, Tell Truths and Actively Seek the Good in life. Creator of the weekend-long ‘Ten Things of Thankful’ hop, she blogs about her thoughts, her world and being a member of The Invisible Moms Club. She finds that when she runs out of words, music can be used to speak for her, and if she had to lose four of her five senses, would keep her hearing, for the idea of a world without music would be far too desolate to contemplate.”

You can follow her on Twitter: @LRConsiderer and on Facebook