Raised on the Radio

Because growing up on 70s television didn't kill me. It just made me who I am today.


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Cozy Up With Your Classic Christmas Standards Playlist!

christmas classic songs playlist

 

Every year you think you want it – something new. You are so sure that you start messing with your iPod, maybe playing with your Pandora or buying a few of those “Target special purchase” CD’s.

But then you realize; it just doesn’t matter. Some songs were done right that one time. You can listen to Martina McBride singing The Christmas Song, but you know it should have been Nat King Cole. Or how about Brad Paisley doing Winter Wonderland, no… not that, that should be Ella.

No matter what your confused, Christmas muddled brain is saying to you, some Christmas songs are meant to be heard this one way, they are classics for a reason. We get all warm and fuzzy remembering them from our childhood being sung just the way we want to hear them today.

 

A Holly Jolly Christmas – The Best Christmas Playlist Ever – The Versions You Remember

The first link takes you to YouTube or you can pop down to the bottom to click and hear the whole playlist. As always *the second link will take you to iTunes so you can own these songs yourself.

Silver Bells – Bing Crosby and Ella Fitzgerald 
*Silver Bells – Silver Bells: Christmas Classics

It’s The Most Wonderful Time of the Year – Andy Williams
*It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year – The Andy Williams Christmas Album

Here Comes Santa Claus – Gene Autry
*Here Comes Santa Claus – Gene Autry

Have a Holly Jolly Christmas – Burl Ives
*A Holly Jolly Christmas – Have a Holly Jolly Christmas

The Christmas Song – Nat King Cole
*The Christmas Song (Merry Christmas To You) – The Christmas Song

Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas – Ella Fitzgerald
*Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas – Ella Wishes You a Swinging Christmas

It’s Beginning to Look A Lot Like Christmas – Perry Como and The Fontaine Sisters
*It’s Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas – Greatest Christmas Songs (Remastered)

I’ll Be Home For Christmas – Dean Martin
*I’ll Be Home for Christmas – The Dean Martin Christmas Album

The First Noel – Frank Sinatra
*The First Noël – A Jolly Christmas From Frank Sinatra

Carol of the Bells – The Robert Shaw Choir
*Carol of the Bells – A Festival of Carols

We Need A Little Christmas – Percy Faith
*We Need a Little Christmas – A Very Percy Faith Christmas: The Christmas Song, Little Drummer Boy, And More Holiday Favorites

The Christmas Waltz – Frank Sinatra
*The Christmas Waltz – Christmas With Sinatra and Friends

Caroling, Caroling – Nat King Cole
*Caroling, Caroling – The Christmas Song

Happy Holidays! – Andy Williams
*Happy Holiday / The Holiday Season – The Andy Williams Christmas Album

Home For the Holidays – The Carpenters
*(There’s No Place Like) Home for the Holidays – Christmas Portrait (The Special Edition)

Winter Wonderland – Ella Fitzgerald
*Winter Wonderland – Ella Wishes You a Swinging Christmas

 

Here are all of the songs on a YouTube playlist. And don’t forget to subscribe up there to get all of our latest posts! No spam EVER!

 


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FirstNotes and ForeverMusic

lizzi guest post ROTR

I was raised in a pretty shut-down household, where the music available was a strict diet of Classic FM (which I now love), Classical CDs (I love some of them), ‘Churchy’ music (still not that keen), and Gilbert and Sullivan (hate it with a passion).

There was one exception (other than the stalwart ‘sung Times Tables’ tapes) – one copy of a hearkening back to my Dad’s childhood; a ‘Hello Children Everywhere’ CD. I listened to it obsessively, whenever I was allowed to use the (gigantic old monster of a) stereo system, in brushed steel, with heavy dials and buttons which swirled deliciously in my hands and would land me in trouble, because somehow the volume always seemed to end up louder.

danny-kaye

So thanks to the lifeline of this one CD, I caught a tiny break and spent my childhood having my mind blown by such wonders as Suzi Miller’s ‘Bimbo’, Burl Ives’ ‘Big Rock Candy Mountain’ and Danny Kaye’s ‘Little White Duck’.

My musical world exploded into life when I went to secondary school.

I’d chosen a school in a town outside the city, which meant being bussed in with a bunch of other local kids. We were herded onto a scabby old, white mini-bus, with a snarkastic driver who tended to be either overly friendly or overly mean, but the journeys had one HUGE redeeming feature, which quite made them a favourite part of my day. The radio.

Tuned for the first time in my LIFE to something beyond the realms of the classical, 103.2 Power FM gave me my first taste of what I’d been missing, and just what depths of wonder there were to explore. Chaka Demus and Pliers ‘Twist and Shout’, D:Ream ‘Things can only get better’, UB40 ‘(I can’t help) Falling In Love With You’, not to mention Rednex, who I can probably hold fully responsible for my ongoing love of countryish music, since then broadened to include such gorgeousness as Bill Monroe, Rascal Flatts and Blake Shelton

I remember with absolute delight my very first tape.

It was given to me for my birthday by neighbours over the road. It was Robson & Jerome’s version of Unchained Melody, with B sides of ‘I believe’ and ‘Saturday Night at the Movies’ (so deeply ingrained in my mind that I didn’t even look it up to check the B sides – I’m probably right, and if not, well it was 18 years ago…). I can’t remember how, but I got a tape player, and discovered, to my delight and awe, that I too, could get Power FM tuned in, directly into my bedroom and began listening at home, ignoring repeated shouts to “Turn that horrible noise down!” as often as I could.

I then discovered (oh sweet day) that a store nearby actually SOLD the music I’d heard on the radio (yes, I was *that* sheltered). My pocket-money immediately became a hugely important deal, and I even began forgoing my weekly Beano comic to buy tapes and tapes…and then I discovered CDs, back when a single was still 99p. To my shame, I can’t remember my first single. Or my first album.

Buying blank tapes and sitting hunched over the radio waiting for my favourite songs to come on, with my finger hovering, poised, over ‘Play’ and ‘Record’ was a massive pastime for me. The irritating DJ or radio jingle forever intertwined with the intro and outro, the missing first three seconds when my attention span had waned.

I developed some serious musical crushes, my ears, mind and soul being touched in ways I’d never felt before – thoughts and emotions expressed in ways I’d never considered possible. I became a cray-cray fan of such acts as Robbie Williams, Alisha’s Attic and All Saints.

And gradually the radio became my companion.

I branched out, finding new stations which weren’t all pop. I discovered rock, house, trance, dance, disco, and later on, music from generations slightly before my own, which is where I feel my musical soul now lives, courtesy of my new-found favourite radio station – 106 Jack FM. They play music from about early in my own musical introduction back to a generation or so before my time, mixed with a few newer tracks for good measure – Aerosmith, Queens of the Stone Age, Dave Edmunds, Faith No More, Queen, Reef, ELO, T-Rex, Tommy James and the Shondells …. But even though it’s my favourite, I can’t stay faithful – my car (which is my ‘Radio Place’) has an old-fashioned stereo/tape player, with a different station (yes, including Classic FM – shh!) programmed into each of its five buttons.

(Small Victory – takes a while to get going; if you want to skip straight to the Good Stuff, head to 2:22 for a guitar riff which just *does things* to me)

In spite of that, my musical ‘old soul’ still has to resort to the not-the-radio resource of YouTube to supply such gorgeousness as The Andrews Sisters, The Beach Boys, Elvis, Flanders and Swann; usually with one or two tracks hitting my ‘favourites’ list on YouTube, as opposed to loving everything the band produced, as in the heyday of First Discovering Music.

But it’s not the same. YouTube is cold and clinical, and sometimes highly irritating (although everything’s ‘on tap’). The DJs on Jack FM have become my pals – I know the ins and outs of their public personas. I follow their news. I even follow the station on Twitter and Facebook. I recognize their voices. I dance in my car to their music choices, and I love it.

The world of music has become an outlet – I can use music to describe how I feel far better than I can use words. Music speaks to the soul rather than the intellect, and since my very first introduction, I knew that radio and I would get along, though it’s definitely moved up in status over the years from ‘companion’ to ‘Forever Friend’. Thank you Radio, for giving me so much.

About the Author:

Lizzi Rogers is a non-professional blogger over at Considerings. Her aim is to Think Deeply, Tell Truths and Actively Seek the Good in life. Creator of the weekend-long ‘Ten Things of Thankful’ hop, she blogs about her thoughts, her world and being a member of The Invisible Moms Club. She finds that when she runs out of words, music can be used to speak for her, and if she had to lose four of her five senses, would keep her hearing, for the idea of a world without music would be far too desolate to contemplate.”

You can follow her on Twitter: @LRConsiderer and on Facebook